Hall of Arms

This room was built in the 17th century. It was originally a closed room and it did not have the door leading to the refectory.

This room was built in the 17th century. It was originally a closed room and it did not have the door leading to the refectory; this room could only be accessed through the door that connects it to the cloister. It is believed that it was originally an office or a study room, as it was near the archive and the library owned by the monastery.

In the 19th century, it was transformed into a hall of arms by the owner family, and a new door was created to connect it to the refectory. The floor is the original flooring of the 17th century, but the wooden coffering of the ceiling and the lamp were added subsequently, in the 19th century.

One notable feature of the room is a magnificent wooden seat of honor with the coat of arms of Philip II of Spain. It was the family who owned the document who had it sculpted in the 19th century, in memory of the visit of the monarch of the House of Hapsburg, who granted the “Royal” title to the monastery.

Next to the entrance door to the cloister, two chairs can be observed, which belonged to the choir of the main church. These chairs are two masterpieces made in wood which date back to the 18th century. Two standards of the Order of Malta are hanging next to the exit door to the refectory.

Various coats of arms can also be observed embellishing the room: a coat of arms of Philip II of Spain, another coat of arms of the Crown of Aragon, and next to the seat of honor, a coat of arms of the Centelles, a Valencian noble family.